Book Review: Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Dear Bookworms,

Alert! Alert! Another Gaiman review coming!

Fat Charlie Nancy lives a perfectly mundane life in London. He has a decent job (which severely under appreciates him) a pretty finance (who may only like him because her mother despises him), and a hugely embarrassing father to boot. He has never had particularly good luck, and while not “fat” can’t seem to shake the nickname his father game him when he was younger. Upon hearing that his father has passed, Fat Charlie makes his way to Florida for the funeral, thus setting into motion a series of events that will change Fat Charlies life forever.

This book definitely ranks up there for me in my top favorite Gaiman books for sure! It had an American Vibes kind of feel as we discover Fat Charlies father was actually a god and he delves into that side of his ancestry that he previously knew nothing about. There was that same dry sense of humor and wit that I have come to anticipate and love with any Gaiman read. The characters were all fantastic and quirky, sometimes borderline ridiculous- in the best possible ways. Watching Fat Charlie grow and evolve was both hilarious and heart stopping at times. No matter what the story, Gaiman has a way of making me really yearn to visit his versions of the world in each and every one of his books.

Add this read to your list friends, its a winner!

XOXO,

Coco

Anansi Boys
By Neil Gaiman

Book Review: Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Dear Bookworms,

I feel like I am slowly making my way through all of Gaimans reads (because I am obsessed with him, check out the tags on this post for other reviews of his books) and this man never disappoints.

I’ll admit I have never seen the popular movie adaptation of this book so I wasn’t sure what to expect, but it was definitely a light, spooky read for kids and adults.

Coraline
By Neil Gaiman

Coraline mostly likes the new flat her and her parents have recently moved into, except for the niggling curiosity about the locked door which once opened, is bricked up. Having been told it’s nothing but the product of turning the once large home into a series of apartments, Coralines curiosity continues to linger. One dreary English day when she is stuck indoors with little else to do, Coraline takes the the key, opens the door, and finds the doorway no longer bricked up, but that it opens into a hallway. Following the hallway into the house next door, Coraline discovers a world mirroring her own, complete with it’s own Mother and Father; but this world is different….and dangerous. Coraline must use all her wits and her bravery to get herself safety out of this world and back to her own.

This read was a fairly quick one, but packed with adventure nonetheless! Gaimans characters and books always have such a unique feel and tone to them, and Coraline was no different. It was that perfect mixture of quirk and darkness with an entertaining plot line that kept me engaged from page one! This one could be read with kids, to kids, by kids, or adults and still be thoroughly enjoyed.

Definitely add this one to your reading list friends!

Until next week!

Book Review: Stardust by Neil Gaiman

Dear Bookworms,

First of all, let me just say (ashamedly) that I have watched, and re-watched, and re-re-watched this movie dozens of times. This one ranks right up there with Princess Bride for me (GASP!). So it pains to me say that upon originally seeing the movie (and the millions of times watching it after) that I had no clue it was originally a Gaiman book.

Stardust
By Neil Gaiman

Needless to say when I found out it was a book I HAD TO READ IT. When i realized it was by Gaiman, I knew I would love it probably even more than the movie.

Tristran Thorne lives in the small quaint town of Wall, England. Named so for the stone wall which divides the town from the land of faerie. The wall is guarded day and night with strict instructions not to let anyone pass, except for when the market comes, once every 9 years to set up in the meadow just outside the town, in the land between Wall and faerie. In the hopes of winning the most beautiful girl in towns affections, Tristran Thorne sets off on an adventure in faerie to bring his beloved back a fallen star. Little does he know, the fallen star isn’t just a lump of metallic space rock, but a young woman. And he isn’t the only one seeking her out. Others search for the star as well, but for reasons which will do her great harm. Meanwhile, the King of Stormhold has passed and his remaining sons are on a quest through faerie in search of his bewitched jeweled necklace, for whoever of the Stormhold blood finds it first, will hold all the power of Stormhold and become it’s next reigning king.

This book has stolen my heart all over again with love for the story of Tristran and Yvaine. While there are marked differences between the book and the movie adaptation, it was still the story I have loved for so many years (which was a relief- I was secretly nervous I wouldn’t enjoy it having seen the movie so many times- usually it’s the other way around for me!) It was expertly crafted and woven together with the various different elements that played into the story of Tristran and Yvaine. It was almost as if their love for each other was written in the stars from the beginning (you see what I did there?)

There was that signature wry and dry humor a plenty which I have come to expect and enjoy with Gaiman’s reads. The only critique I have with the difference to the movie is that I really, thoroughly enjoyed Robert DeNiros character (the captain of the ship that caught lightening for all you all who have seen the movie) and all the time Tristran and Yvaine had on the pirate ship in the movie which just wasn’t the same or as prominent a part in the book. Pirate part aside, the book was simply magical and wonderful and now I feel the need to watch the movie to be with the characters again, for just a little longer.

I will say, the audiobook version I listened to (read by Neil- hands down one of my favorite narrators) had a really lovely interview with Neil at the end that made for interesting listening. He discussed how he came up with the idea for the story and the different stages of its genesis. Fascinating listen!

As a side note- I know the movie is family friendly but the book is more for older teen/adults.

Until next week!

XOXO,

Coco